Hallowell installs historical crane to recognize quarrying history

| Published on June 18, 2014

Workers install a preserved crane in Hallowell, Maine, on June 11, 2014. (Photo credit: Communicado - Nancy McGinnis)

Workers install a preserved crane in Hallowell, Maine, on June 11, 2014. (Photo credit: Communicado – Nancy McGinnis)

An old wooden crane that once worked in the granite quarries of Hallowell, Maine, now serves as a monument to the town’s quarrying history.

Workers have installed the historical crane at Hallowell Waterfront Park, the Portland Press Herald reports.

“We hope people see it as a striking monument and testament to an industry that was so dominant in Hallowell for so many years and contributed so much to all across America,” Gerry Mahoney, a residents leading the project, told the Portland Press Herald. “It should be a source of community pride, and that’s what we were hoping to recognize.”

The crane was discovered in the former Hussey Quarry, once owned by Hallowell Granite Co. It has two 35-foot hexagon wooden beams: one stationary vertical mast held in place by four guy wires, and one boom attached to the mast at a 45-degree angle. When found, the crane still held pieces of granite suspended from cables at the end of the boom.

Hallowell Waterfront Park is near the location where the crane likely sat in the late 19th century and moved slabs of granite onto ships, Al Hague, a Hallowell resident who worked on the project, said last year.

The Hallowell City Council approved the installation in April 2013, and residents began working to raise the approximately $30,000 required to repair and install the crane.

The Portland Press Herald notes that another $5,000 to $6,000 is still needed for the project. Those funds will be used to complete the monument, provide landscaping and add signage.

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