House Appropriations Subcommittee approves $44.1 billion USDOT, HUD budget

| Published on June 20, 2013

The House Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies has approved the House Appropriation Committee’s $44.1 billion budget for the departments of Transportation (USDOT) and Housing and Urban Development (HUD), according to our sister site, Better Roads.

The proposed budget is $7.7 billion below the current 2013 budget and $13.9 billion below current sequester levels.

According to a previous report from Better Roads, the bill calls for $15.3 billion in discretionary funds for USDOT.

The budget includes $828 million in both mandatory and discretionary funding for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), $572 million for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, nearly $41 billion from the Highway Trust Fund for the Federal Highway program, $11.8 billion for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), $1.16 billion for the Federal Railroad Administration, $184.5 million for rail safety funding, nearly $2 billion for the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), $8.6 billion in state and local transit grant funding from the Mass Transit Account, $1.82 billion for Capital Investment Grants and $326 million for the Maritime Administration.

The bill also calls for a total of $28.5 billion for HUD, including $24.9 billion for Public and Indian Housing, $75 million to fully fund President Obama’s request for veterans’ housing vouchers, $4.8 billion for Community Planning and Development programs and $1.6 billion for the Community Development Block Grant formula program. It also includes $9.6 billion in funding for other housing programs, including $126 million for housing for the disabled and $374.6 million for housing for the elderly.

The budget goes to the full committee on June 27.

A live recording of the hearing and a copy of the legislation are available here.

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