Luck Stone, EPA ‘clearing the air’

| Published on October 15, 2010

Luck Stone initiative with EPA, others means cleaner, greener power at four plants

Funding from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to Virginia Clean Cities and James Madison University will help launch the first construction repowering project in Virginia to reduce harmful diesel pollution at four Luck Stone plants operating in Richmond, Charlottesville, Leesburg, and Burkeville, Virginia.

(Pictured right to left) Charlie Luck, president and CEO of Luck Stone Corp., and Shawn Garvin, regional administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), pause at Luck Stone’s shop in Goochland, Va., following the EPA grant check presentation

(Pictured right to left) Charlie Luck, president and CEO of Luck Stone Corp., and Shawn Garvin, regional administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), pause at Luck Stone’s shop in Goochland, Va., following the EPA grant check presentation

EPA’s $710,000 Diesel Emissions Reduction Act grant, combined with $1.1 million from Richmond, Va.-based Luck Stone, will enable the company to repower or replace 11 off-road construction vehicles with new, more efficient diesel engines and generators.

“Putting clean diesel engines to use will bring cleaner, healthier air for the workers and neighborhoods surrounding these plants,” said EPA mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin. “EPA is pleased to support Virginia Clean Cities’ newest initiative to improve air quality and public health for Virginia’s citizens.”

Luck Stone’s Vice President of Environmental Design & Development Doug Palmore said that Luck Stone is honored to be participating in the inaugural construction repower project for Virginia along with the EPA, James Madison University, Virginia’s Department of Environmental Quality and Virginia Clean Cities

“This partnership lines up perfectly with our environmental ethic and practices which focus on creating a net positive outcome for the environment and communities we serve,” Palmore said in a written press statement.

Pictured (left to right) are Doug Palmore of Luck Stone Corp., Brett Alkins of Caterpillar, Ken Newbold of James Madison University, John Pullen of Luck Stone Corp., Shawn Garvin of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), David Tyeryar, U.S. deputy secretary of transportation, Charlie Luck of Luck Stone Corp., Yogesh Doshi of the Department of Environmental Quality, Jerome Brooks of the Department of Environmental Quality, and Chelsea Jenkins of Virginia Clean Cities, accepting the EPA’S $710,000 Diesel Emissions Reduction Act grant that will allow Luck Stone to repower or replace 11 off-road construction vehicles with new, more efficient diesel engines and generators

The Luck Stone project is the first construction equipment repowering project in Virginia to be funded by EPA. The new engines will result in a 50 percent reduction in nitrogen oxides and 65 percent reduction in particulate matter for each piece of equipment. Nitrogen oxides and particulate matter are prevalent air pollutants linked to asthma and other respiratory illness. Annually, the project will eliminate 30.85 tons of nitrogen oxide, two tons of particulate matter, 11.93 tons of carbon monoxide, and 2.74 tons of hydrocarbons from being emitted at the four plants.  In addition, the project will create about 20 jobs.

“The heavy trucks and equipment that are being repowered or replaced are not only striking in their size and capability, but are critical to Luck Stone’s ability to provide quality crushed stone,” said Virginia Clean Cities Executive Director Chelsea Jenkins.  “Virginia Clean Cities and James Madison University are energized to participate in such a significant project that will aide in curbing the impact such equipment has on the environment and ultimately Virginia’s economy and the health of its citizens.”

For more information

EPA’s National Clean Diesel Campaign Web site: http://www.epa.gov/diesel/

EPA’s regional diesel Web site: http://www.epa.gov/reg3artd/diesel/index.htm

Luck Stone Corp. corporate Web site: http://www.luckstone.com

Virginia Clean Cities: http://www.hrccc.org/

 

What is Clean Cities

  • Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), Clean Cities is a govern­ment-industry partnership designed to reduce petroleum consumption in the trans­portation sector. Clean Cities contributes to the energy, environmental, and economic security of the United States by supporting local decisions to reduce our dependence on imported petroleum. Established in 1993 in response to the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992, the partnership provides tools and resources for voluntary, community-centered programs to reduce consumption of petroleum-based fuels. In almost 90 coalitions, government agen­cies and private companies voluntarily come together under the umbrella of Clean Cities. The partnership helps all parties identify mutual interests and meet the objectives of reducing the use of imported oil, develop­ing regional economic opportunities, and improving air quality.
  • Clean Cities deploys technologies and practices developed by VTP. These include truck stop electrification and onboard auxiliary power to reduce fuel used in idling trucks, hybrid electric vehicles, the blending of non petroleum-based fuels (such as ethanol or biodiesel) with conventional fuels, higher efficiency vehicles and driving practices, and the cornerstone of the portfo­lio, alternative fuels. The alternative fuels, which are defined by EPAct and supported by Clean Cities, include ethanol, biodiesel, hydrogen, electricity, liquefied petroleum gas (propane), and natural gas.

Source: U.S. Department of Energy/Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies Program

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e information

EPA’s National Clean Diesel Campaign Web site: http://www.epa.gov/diesel/.

EPA’s regional diesel Web site: http://www.epa.gov/reg3artd/diesel/index.htm.

Luck Stone Corp. corporate Web site: http://www.luckstone.com

Virginia Clean Cities: http://www.hrccc.org/

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