Quarry meteorite may hold key to life’s beginnings

| Published on August 7, 2014

You never know what you’re going to stumble upon during a day at the quarry. In Sweden, workers discovered a meteorite but it wasn’t your typical solar rock. This specific meteorite may hold the key to Earth’s resurgence of life a little over 500 million years ago.

Photo Credit: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Volume 400, 15 August 2014, Pages 145–152.

Photo Credit: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Volume 400, 15 August 2014, Pages 145–152.

Several researchers who have been studying the meteorite claim it may be evidence of a collision between two asteroids millions of years ago. Scientists have always wondered the reason behind a lull of biodiversity on Earth. One theory is that two asteroids collided, creating an increased number of meteorite impacts.

However, there has never been any evidence of a second asteroid to support that theory.

Other meteorites have been found at the same Swedish quarry, but they were typical L Chondrites. This specific meteorite is extremely unique from the others. Its crystals are different, but its layers are similar suggesting it arrived around the same time of a much larger meteor shower.

Scientists are hard at work studying the meteorite, hoping to find confirmation of a second asteroid to support theories made many years ago.

While there is no timetable for the completion of the study, it does support the theory that you never know what you may stumble across during a day at the quarry.

advertisement
comments powered by Disqus

SUBSCRIBE & FOLLOW

advertisement

TWITTER

FACEBOOK

BLOG

advertisement
advertisement
advertisement