USGS reports total aggregate production and consumption up in 2016

Kerry Clines

March 10, 2017

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports that crushed stone production totaled approximately 1.48 billion tons valued at $16.2 billion in 2016, an increase in tonnage of 11 percent over 2015. Consumption also increased to a total of approximately 1.54 billion tons in 2016. Consumption has increased every quarter since the second quarter of 2013, with an average increase of 7 percent over the same period of the previous year. Stronger construction activity and recovery in the private and residential sectors has shown a level of growth not seen since late 2005, so the consumption of construction aggregates is likely to continue increasing. Aggregate consumption is expected to reach or exceed the historical annual average of the past 50 years, which was a 2- to 4-percent increase per year.

The crushed stone was produced by 1,430 companies operating 3,700 quarries, 82 underground mines, and 187 sales and distribution yards in 50 States. Texas was the top producer, followed by Pennsylvania, Florida, Missouri, Ohio, North Carolina, Georgia, Indiana, Illinois, and New York, in descending order. Altogether, the top 10 producing states accounted for more than half of the total crushed stone output

Construction sand and gravel production in 2016 increased to 1.01 billion tons valued at $8.9 billion, an increase in tonnage of 7 percent over 2015. Consumption also increased to approximately 1.01 billion tons. Consumption has increased every quarter since the second quarter of 2013, with an average increase of 6 percent over the same period of the previous year. Stronger construction activity and recovery in the private sector and residential construction in 2016 has shown a level of growth not seen since late 2005, and that increase is likely to continue, and is expected to reach or exceed the historical annual average of the past 50 years, which was a 2- to 4 percent increase per year.

The construction sand and gravel industry remained concerned with environmental, health, permitting, safety, and zoning regulations. Sand and gravel operations have been moving away from densely populated regions, and that is expected to continue due to regulations and local sentiment. The resulting shortages of construction sand and gravel in those areas would likely result in higher-than-average price increases.

The construction sand and gravel was produced by an estimated 4,100 companies and government agencies from approximately 6,300 operations in 50 States. Texas was the top producer, followed by California, Michigan, Minnesota, Utah, Washington, New York, Arizona, Ohio, and Colorado, in descending order. Those 10 states accounted for approximately 55 percent of total output.

Additional production information by quarter for each state, geographic division, and the United States is reported in the U.S. Geological Survey quarterly Mineral Industry Surveys for Crushed Stone and Sand and Gravel (Construction).

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